5 Factors in Hiring a Social Media Consultant

Do you know how to hire a consultant? Inner Architect’s focus is Social Media Marketing based on the integration of social media channels with direct marketing  strategies. We focus on producing positive measurable results for our clients.

You are a COO, Marketing Director, or business owner and you are in charge of creating, executing, and maintaining a social media marketing plan. You understand the following challenges in executing this task:

  • Time: you do not have the time to execute and maintain your company’s social media marketing plan
  • Expertise: you do not have the expertise to leverage Twitter, Facebook, Google+, blogging, or mobile applications
  • Expense: you do not have the budget to hire, train, and pay benefits to  new employees to execute your marketing plan

What Are You Getting From Your Social Media Consultant?

What are you getting when you hire a social media consultant to run your company’s social media marketing efforts?

  1. Goals: have you identified your goals? Do you want to drive traffic to a brick n mortar? Are you looking for ecommerce online store traffic? Is your firm interested in protecting brand recognition and reputation? Are you tasked with growth?
  2. Strategy: do you have a specific strategy that you want the consultant to execute?
  3. Plan of Action: did you receive a written plan of action from your consultant on how they will achieve your desired goals?
  4. ROI Measurement: Is your consultant explaining how he/she will measure their efforts within the chosen social networks to provide a clear picture of the ROI for your investment in their services?
  5. Progress Reports: Has your consultant set up a schedule of regular reports detailing their progress?

Twitter’s Practical Uses for Today’s Business: Health Care Industry

phil-bauman

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 3-10-09

Phil Bauman’s “140 Health Care Uses for Twitter” is a fantastic example of the sharing and brainstorming that is the power of social media and Web 2.0. This is a brilliant display of matching needs to solutions, giving value to those of us looking to understand how to utilize Twitter for practical business uses, and it provides a template for social media consultants when thinking of ways to use Twitter with other industries, niches, or specific company products or services.

Exercise for Consultants:

Examine Phil’s list and consider how you can create a list of uses for Twitter (or other social media tools):

  • Expert Knowledge: find an expert in the industry, niche, or business you are attempting to find Twitter uses for and learn as much as possible about your target
  • Examples: find examples of other industries or niches already successfully utilizing Twitter. What can you use from those methods that fit your target industry?
  • Ask, Ask, Ask: ask people what is practical or feasible. What Twitter functions will actually work and which ones are not suited for your target industry?

Phil’s 140 Heathcare Uses for Twitter:

  1. Tissue recruitment (for kidney and other organs, including blood)
  2. Epidemiological survey
  3. Disaster alerting and response
  4. Emergency response team management
  5. Supportive care for patients and family members
  6. Diabetes management (blood glucose tracking)
  7. Maintaining a personal health diary
  8. Adverse event reporting in the clinical setting and other pharmacovigilance functions
  9. Emitting critical laboratory values to nurses and physicians
  10. Alarming silent codes (psychiatric emergencies, security incidents)
  11. Drug safety alerts from the FDA
  12. Risk management communication
  13. Augmenting telemedicine
  14. Issuing Amber alerts
  15. Issuing alerts for missing nursing home residents
  16. Exercise management and encouragement
  17. Weight management and support
  18. Biomedical device data capture and reporting
  19. Nutritional diary and tracking
  20. Coordinating preoperative, perioperative and postoperative care (among pharmacy, nursing and surgical services)
  21. Medical service collaboration in the clinical setting
  22. Triage management in emergency rooms
  23. Census management/monitoring
  24. Arranging outpatient care
  25. Crowdsourcing for health care resources
  26. Shift-bidding for nurses and other health care professionals
  27. Mood tracking (for patients with bipolar and other mood disorders)
  28. Patient care reminders in the clinical setting
  29. Prescription management, including pharmacy refill reminders
  30. Daily health tips from authoritative sources
  31. Location awareness during crisis
  32. Occupational safety response
  33. Hazardous materials communication
  34. “Quick and dirty” diagnostic brainstorming between physicians (e.g. ’symptom clustering’)
  35. Clinical case education for (residents following attendings)
  36. Physician opinion-sharing
  37. Promoting Domestic Violence awareness
  38. Raising Child Abuse awareness
  39. USMLE preparation for medical licensing
  40. NCLEX for preparation for nursing licensing
  41. Recruitment of health care staff
  42. Alcohol and other substance abuse support
  43. Issuing doctor’s orders
  44. Environmental alerts: pollen counts, pollution levels, heat waves, severe weather alerts
  45. Remote wound care assistance
  46. Rural area health care communication
  47. Micro-sharing of pertinent patient information
  48. Micro-sharing of diagnostic results (blood tests, echocardiography, radiological images)
  49. Internal facility customer service (a hospital equivalent of @Comcastcares – c’mon hospitals!)
  50. Publishing health-related news
  51. Psychiatric “check-ins” for patients
  52. Nursing mentoring and collaboration
  53. Publishing disease-specific tips
  54. Childcare support
  55. Fund raising for hospitals and health-related causes
  56. Updating patient family members during procedures
  57. Live-tweeting surgical procedures for education
  58. Rare diseases tracking and and resource connection
  59. Reporting hospital staff injuries
  60. Tracking patient trends
  61. Tracking disease-specific trends
  62. Checking hospital ratings with other health care consumers
  63. Providing around-the-clock disease management
  64. Connecting genetic researchers with physicians
  65. Publishing the latest advances in biomedical devices
  66. Tracking antibiotic resistance
  67. Real-time satisfaction surveys with immediate follow-up for problem resolution
  68. Issuing asthma alerts
  69. Data collection for tracking facility patterns (process-performance, supply-chain and staffing problems)
  70. Live-tweeting medical conferences
  71. Keyword-tracking of health-related topics via Search.Twitter
  72. Posting quick nursing assessments that feed into electronic medical records (EMRs)
  73. Improving medical rounding systems
  74. Clinical trial awareness
  75. Hospital administration
  76. Sharing peer-to-peer reviews of articles of interest
  77. Connecting patients with similar disease processes
  78. Enhancing health-related support groups (e.g. buddy-systems for depression)
  79. Providing smoking cessation assistance
  80. Medical appliance support (e.g. at-home: colostomy care, infusion-pumps, wound-vacs)
  81. Reporting medical device malfunctions
  82. Tweeting updates to facility policies and procedures
  83. Arranging appointments with health care providers
  84. Product safety alerts
  85. Food safety alerts
  86. Information on women’s health
  87. Pain management
  88. Hospital reputation monitoring
  89. Publishing hospital-sponsored events in local communities
  90. Community health outreach
  91. Bioterrorism awareness and preparedness
  92. Issuing updates to hospital services to the public
  93. Insurance claim management
  94. Ethical, permission-based following of patients
  95. Micro-sharing consent for surgical and other procedures
  96. Patient-sharing of health-related experiences
  97. Posting ‘bread crumbs’ of facility experiences (”I had a bypass at this hospital and it went well but the food almost killed me.”)
  98. Patient searches for others confronting similar problems
  99. Stress management
  100. Mental health awareness
  101. Posting homeless shelter needs
  102. Food bank resource management
  103. Transmitting patient data to patients who are traveling abroad
  104. Generating streams of authoritative health care content online
  105. Exposing medical quakery
  106. Micro-sharing documentation for advanced medical directives
  107. Discussing public health care policy
  108. Developing stronger patient-provider relationships
  109. Tracking the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals
  110. Following health marketing
  111. Tracking influenza alerts from the CDC
  112. Exchanging/soliciting scientific validation of alternative health claims
  113. Following ad-hoc conferences on eHealth like HealthCampPhila
  114. Tracking toxic diseases
  115. Tracking HIV news
  116. Issuing/exchanging dietary tips
  117. Tweeting what you eat
  118. Comparing nursing home performance
  119. Coordinating clinical instruction
  120. Communicating with nursing supervisors
  121. Public safety announcements
  122. Tracking FDA guideline updates
  123. Tracking the progress of developing pharmaceuticals
  124. Broadcasting infant care tips to new parents
  125. Publishing vaccination/immunization services locations, hours and reminders
  126. Reporting adverse events to FDA (currently not available via Twitter: why not?)
  127. Obtaining information on Medicare and Medicaid
  128. Case management functions
  129. Clinical education coordination
  130. Facilitating patient-transfer processes
  131. Patient-information retrieval
  132. Reporting breeches of universal precautions in health care facilities
  133. Posting daily nursing tips
  134. Exchanging physician humor (we’re all human)
  135. Closing the digital divide with respect to health care information
  136. Coordinating allied health care services during patient admissions
  137. Coordinating patient discharges with all services
  138. Post-discharge patient consultations and follow-up care
  139. Helping device technicians to communicate directly with manufacturers
  140. Discussing HIPAA reform in the age of micro-sharing

Entrepreneur’s Ultimate Twitter Guide to Applications

Twitter is one of the most important social media tools for entrepreneurs, job seekers, small businesses, and large companies. The multiple roles this tool plays in my business for Inner Architect are as research resource, broadcast mechanism, customer service pathway, and most importantly direct pipeline to new trends.

In addition to all this functionality and value, Twitter has a huge legion of fans dedicated to creating open source (free) applications to be used along with Twitter. The following list is a fantastic resource provided by blendingthemix.com. Thank you goes to my new friend, and essential read, Paul the creator of Blending the Mix–I owe you!

The Top 100 List

Ok, so the title is a little sensationalist, but I had to get you here somehow so you could see the most bookmarked web-based Twitter applications of the moment!! Note that these has been put together on the basis of the number of saved bookmarks on delicious and clearly not THE definitive list based on registered users or traffic.

  1. twittervision (4282 overall)
  2. twitterfeed (3867 overall)
  3. twhirl (3319 overall)
  4. tweetscan (2655 overall)
  5. twistori (2631 overall)
  6. twitter-search (2500 overall)
  7. tweetdeck (2439 overall)
  8. twitpic (2244 overall)
  9. hellotxt (1979 overall)
  10. twitterrific (1729 overall)
  11. twitterholic (1612 overall)
  12. tweetstats (1549 overall)
  13. twellow (1527 overall)
  14. twitturly (1460 overall)
  15. twitter-grader (1431 overall)
  16. twitscoop (1410 overall)
  17. quotably (1334 overall)
  18. twitterlocal (1319 overall)
  19. monitter (1285 overall)
  20. twubble (1264 overall)
  21. twittearth (1191 overall)
  22. grouptweet (1180 overall)
  23. hashtags (1124 overall)
  24. tweetburner (1113 overall)
  25. twitbin (1093 overall)
  26. twittercounter (1081 overall)
  27. tweetlater (994 overall)
  28. terraminds-twitter-search (966 overall)
  29. tweetvolume (944 overall)
  30. qwitter (935 overall)
  31. friendorfollow (929 overall)
  32. twitthis (902 overall)
  33. twist (883 overall)
  34. twitter-karma (854 overall)
  35. xpenser (822 overall)
  36. twittermail (813 overall)
  37. twemes (803 overall)
  38. tweetbeep (803 overall)
  39. twitdir (770 overall)
  40. twitxr (767 overall)
  41. twitterfox (760 overall)
  42. hahlo (688 overall)
  43. twinfluence (654 overall)
  44. tweetmeme (652 overall)
  45. tweetwheel (647 overall)
  46. twuffer (636 overall)
  47. botanicalls-twitter-diy (631 overall)
  48. twittersnooze (629 overall)
  49. twtpoll (614 overall)
  50. mrtweet (609 overall)
  51. twittercal (605 overall)
  52. remember-the-milk-for-twitter (594 overall)
  53. snitter (593 overall)
  54. twitterpatterns (585 overall)
  55. strawpollnow (575 overall)
  56. twitterfone (547 overall)
  57. whoshouldifollow (539 overall)
  58. twitbacks (539 overall)
  59. tweetr (526 overall)
  60. twitdom (525 overall)
  61. tweetree (522 overall)
  62. favrd (520 overall)
  63. election.twitter (506 overall)
  64. peoplebrowsr (501 overall)
  65. tweetclouds (498 overall)
  66. pockettweets (498 overall)
  67. cursebird (488 overall)
  68. twistory (480 overall)
  69. twitterverse (470 overall)
  70. tweetgrid (470 overall)
  71. twittermap (466 overall)
  72. tweetag (458 overall)
  73. twilert (457 overall)
  74. twitterposter (456 overall)
  75. loudtwitter (443 overall)
  76. twitterfriends (439 overall)
  77. spaz (431 overall)
  78. be-a-magpie (421 overall)
  79. tweetake (420 overall)
  80. twitter-friends-network-browser (419 overall)
  81. matt (414 overall)
  82. twitter100 (411 overall)
  83. colorwar2008 (411 overall)
  84. twitteroo (408 overall)
  85. tweetrush (389 overall)
  86. fuelfrog (385 overall)
  87. twitter-blocks (383 overall)
  88. tweeterboard (375 overall)
  89. spy (373 overall)
  90. twerpscan (372 overall)
  91. splitweet (371 overall)
  92. twittergram (364 overall)
  93. twittgroups (362 overall)
  94. brightkit (361 overall)
  95. twitlinks (359 overall)
  96. twitternotes (358 overall)
  97. tweetwasters (354 overall)
  98. foodfeed (352 overall)
  99. twitterblacklist (348 overall)
  100. twitku (347 overall)

Thanks to MOMB for doing all the hard work.

Golden Gate Computer Society Presents Tony Stubblebine of Crowdvine

The Golden Gate Computer Society is a fantastic group designed to help educate people, provide networking opportunities, and create a forum for new ideas and trends in the computer industry. Keeping with it’s long standing practice of presenting important speakers and information, tonight’s event, at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel in San Rafael, showcases Tony Stubblebine of Crowdvine. Watch the video to learn more about Tony and his innovative company: