50 Things I Learned In 50 Years

What does it mean to turn 50 if you can’t share what you have learned with your friends? The following are 50 things, from business to life, I have learned, experienced, or watched in 50 years on this planet. If you have a list please let us hear it. The 50 things are categorized but not ranked~

Business

1. “Your word is your reputation”: say what you’ll do, do what you say
2. “Learning requires heart”: if you don’t want it, it won’t happen
3. “People want to buy they don’t want to be sold”: help people get what they want then you get what you want
4. “Preparation starts at home”: show up to work ready to go
5. “Don’t lie to yourself, it’s unbecoming”: if you don’t believe in your work, you will never succeed
6. “Writing is your publication platform”: learn to blog, express your ideas, create your public record the first jewel in the triple crown of building you as a brand
7. “Under promise and over deliver”: if you positively surprise people they will always react positively
8. “Telephone cold calling is the most underrated business strategy”: the science meets art of selling
9. “Multi Level Marketing is rarely a Win-Win situation”: me first with a huge helping of pie in the sky
10. “Technology is the life blood of business”: things change for the better
11. “Networking is a contact activity”: working the room is NOT networking
12. “Everyone should have a manual labor job in their background”: lessons in humility one jackhammer blast at a time
13. “Education is the great equalizer”: don’t squander your opportunity
14. “You make your own breaks”: capitalize when the moment arrives
15. “Overconfidence is a weakness”: check your ego at the door it might save your deal
16. “Mentoring is a two way street”: whether you are giving or receiving it is a win-win situation
17. “Dress for success”: if you look good you feel good
18. “Never underestimate your opponent”: it may come back to haunt you
19. “Public speaking is crucial to a career”: this is the 2nd jewel in the trip crown of building you as a brand
20. “Leadership is a skill you can develop”: this is the 3rd jewel in the trip crown of building you as a brand
21. “Listening is the skill”: this separates the stars from the pack
22. “Fear is contageous”: if you are fearful in any business situation it shows
23. “Give respect”: recognize excellence
24. “Expectations are dangerous”: if you have to ask you have never had to live up to them
25. “Winning isn’t everything”: it’s the only thing

Life

1. “Your family is your rock”: if you are blessed with a solid family you must never forget them
2. “Travel early and often”: experiencing other places at a young page accellerates personal growth
3. “Live somewhere else”: leave your hometown and live somewhere far away
4. “Learn to adapt”: if you can adapt you can survive
5. “Living overseas”: Athens, Greece is amazing
6. “Follow your dreams”: if you fear trying you will miss out
7. “College is irreplaceable”: personal growth that continues to show up years later
8. Working in the music business: scouting bands while in college a dream job
9. Basketball: playing in front of 5,000+ wishing I could make it a career
10. Room mates: in college at UC Davis 1980 the brother of King Huesen of Jordan
11. Training: one training session with 1980’s Professional Kickboxing Association light heavyweight champion Dennis Alexio
12. Robin Williams: partying with the legendary “Mork” without ever knowing it was him
13. My father: the greatest teacher of humility, graciousness, and toughness
14. My mother: my heart and the person who challenged me to be kind and positive
15. Saving a life: helping a friend make a new start
16. “Losing to learn”: losing teaches you about yourself, winning is not the same teacher
17. “Watching your childhood friend play in the NFL”: Monday night football at the ‘Stick and my friend is on the field as a starting wide receiver for the Atlanta Falcons
18. “Moderation is everything”: if you allow anything to control you, you haven’t learned a thing
19. Jet skiing in Greece: the greatest adventure in my life riding behind a 25 story cruise ship, inside the wake funnel, jumping through the wake 5 miles outside the Mykanos harbor
20. Regrets: being invited to tryout for my college basketball team by the coach and declining for nothing more than the fear of rejection
21. Redemption: learning from this fear and accepting every challenge and opportunity with open arms
22. “First Kisses”: Kim in 5th grade changed my view of girls forever
23. Wine: so much more than a drink. It’s a lifestyle, appreciation for history, part of my cultural background
24. “Friendship”: they last only when you participate, work at it, and give
25. “Humor”: nearly everything is better with a laugh

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A Job Seeker’s Day In The World of Social Media

Chicago Sun-Times published this deansguide article 2-08-09

In my post “Job Seekers How Do You Organize Your Day?” I ask the reader to identify whether they were making 10 mistakes  in their job search. As a follow up to this article I want to outline a day in the life of a job seeker who utilizes social media for their job search efforts. No resumes are sent in the making of this day-just value.

Daily Structure for Job Seekers Utilizing Social Media

1. 8:00am Check email:

2. 8:30am Check Google Reader:  Job Seekers should have their feed reader filled with the following resources:

a.) Blogs authored by companies that are on your company target list
b.) Linkedin Q&A, where you can follow relevant information to your targeted niche
c.) Blogs authored by associations or networking blogs within your field of interest
d.) Twitter feeds from recruiters, career strategists, and your local job market news agencies

3. 9:30am Linkedin: Create a new message in the “What are you working on” tool on your home page. This tool provides exposure of your activities to your entire network:

deans-linkedin-twitter-box

4.  9:45am Linkedin: Ask or Answer a Question to demonstrate your expertise

5.  10:30am Blog:  Check your blog stats, answer any comments, monitor traffic for each blog article within the last week, check keyword and Referrers sections

6.  11:00am Write Article: Choose a subject from the research you performed in your Google Reader and email check.

7.  11:45am Lunch-Twitter: Broadcast your new article & mine for article resources

8.  12:45pm Social Media Networking: Deliver your value by leaving link(s) to your article(s) on your targeted company’s blog(s), mass media blogs, industry association sites, and influential blogs comment sections. Ex below Ryan Phillipenko left a link (in red) to his blog .

deans-comment-ex

9.  2:00pm Check Email-Twitter: Return all messages and reach out to one new contact

10. 2:30pm Research Networking: Look for offline networking meetings, events, meetups, tweetups, and charity events

11.  3:30pm Cold Calls: Call your network and offer your value. Offer to volunteer, provide free services, or offer any breaking news or resources that will help your networking partners

12.  4:00pm Twitter: Tweet your latest article, leave at least 5 new messages with valuable resource links, connect via conversation with at least 3 new people

13. 4:45pm Review Monster.com & Careerbuilder.com: stay connected to these sites

14. 5:15pm  Linkedin Answer Follow up: Look for follow up to questions that are niche specific to your job search.

15. 5:45pm  Read One Social Media Blog: Read at least one current article from social media experts Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Peter Kim, Pat Kitano, or InnerArchitect

Job Seekers and Entrepreneurs: Drive Your Competition Crazy

Reality Check

“If any of my competitors were drowning, I’d stick a hose in their mouth.” Ray Kroc

Harsh words no doubt but if you have ever read about McDonald’s founder Ray Kroc they fit his personality. Unlike Mr. Kroc’s take no prisoners attitude, Guy Kawasaki suggests that the best way drive your competition crazy is by “constantly innovating and serving your customers.”

If you are a entrepreneur or a job seeker go buy Guy Kawsaki’s latest book “Reality Check.” Begin on Chapter 66 with “The Art of Driving Your Competition Crazy” for the best practical advice on how to stand out, be memorable, and create your differentiating factor. Also check out the blog for more information. Although there are 8 important steps worth serious consideration, one stands out as the theme of Kawasaki’s advice: Focus on the Customer.

Focus on the Customer:  Entrepreneur

The irony here is that rather than trying to do something to your competitor(s), “the best way to drive your competition crazy is not to do anything to it.” The strategy to success is to focus on your customer by concentrating on great customer service, out-innovating the competition, and out-pricing them.

Focus on the Hiring Manager: Job Seeker

In the same respects there is an irony in this situation too. Instead of the job seeker attempting to out sell, out brag, or out maneuver his/her resume to be the best resume, the job seeker needs to concentrate on the hiring manager’s happiness.

This happiness can be achieved by creating value through a blog, a great Linkedin profile, and a social media broadcasting system. The goal for job seekers should be to remove the resume review process, time lost, costly hours wasted by a hiring manager who does not want to go through this process. By making a valuable case and delivering a message of value through target marketing, job seekers could completely remove this burden from the hiring manager.

Six Principles of Influence: Create Change That Benefits Your Customer

Influence is one of the most important factors in any business from the one-off entrepreneur to the largest global corporations. To understand the power of influence and persuasion, you must first understand the definition of influence.

The best definition is offered by one of the world’s leading experts on influence, persuasion, and negotiation Dr. Robert Cialdini as told in his interview for Guy Kawasaki’s great book “Reality Check.” Dr. Chialdini, a psychology professor at Arizona State University and Phd defines influence:

“Influence means creating change in some way. Change can be in an attitude, it can be in a perception, or a behavior. But in all instances, we can’t lay claim to influence until we can demonstrate that we’ve changed someone.”

Six Universal Principles of Influence

1. Reciprocation: People give back and treat you the same way you treat them

2. Scarcity: People are motivated to “seize the opportunities” of a limited offer that you provide to them if they realize the supply of this offer is rare or in dwindling availability

3. Authority: The greater your knowledge and credibility on a subject is the easier it is to persuade people

4. Commitment: People will feel the need and obligation to “comply with your request” if it is consistent with what they have publicly agreed (committed) to in your presence

5. Liking: The degree to which people know and like you is the main factor in their preference to say “yes” to you

6. Consensus: People love company in most decisions. If you give them evidence that others, just like them, have said yes to you, they then “will be likely” to say yes to you more often than not

Guy Kawasaki’s “Reality Check”: How Not to Choke

My Photo

Guy Kawasaki

In Guy Kawasaki’s wonderful book “Reality Check” we are treated to a two, that’s right 2, page chapter titled simply “How Not to Choke.” Choking may be the worst possible word to have attached to your career, athletic performance, and any moment that is meaningful in your life. To choke is to blow it by not having the nerve, losing your cool, blanking, freezing in the moment, or any number of horrific things a mind can do when it goes on lock down at the worst possible time. H3re are Guy’s ways to avoid choking.

Three Ways to Avoid Choking:

1. Avoid Negative People: stay away from negative people because what they say about you “can lead to you becoming what people say about you.”  Guy’s advice is to simply avoid them or “create product and serve them like hell.”

2. Invoke Positive Stereotypes: Positivity can “enhance performance.” Guy notes that Silicon Valley is a fantastic place for young people to start companies and that the “wunderkind” tag is a great example of a positive stereotype.

3. Frame or Reframe Yourself: Guy quotes Dr. George Lakoff  “you can control which groups identify with and the strength of that association.”

In essence the company you keep, the attitude you exude, and the perception you create are the most powerful ways to avoid choking in any situation. If you want more great advice, check out Guy’s favorite books. For even more great information, investigate Alltop.com Guy’s latest user content resource.

Real Time Airline Flight Tracking System: Holiday Time Management Tool

Do you have family and friends visiting you this Holiday Season? With the crush of travelers around this time of year, flight plans often get delayed or even canceled due to a number of issues. The ability to follow your family’s flight in real time, without the hassle of an airline 800 phone automated prompting system, can be a relief.

One of the greatest tools to follow your friends and  family’s airline travel progress is the Flight Tracker by myrateplan.com. This is a quick tool that tracks flights in real time providing a map of the plane’s location, departure times, any delay information, and estimiated time of arrival.

Time management around the holidays can be a challenge. With the Flight Tracking system, you can check one more task off your list.

Realtors Do You Understand the 5 Levels of Twitter Acceptance?

One of the best tools for measuring your commitment and understanding of the micro-blogging power Twitter.com comes from social media marketing superstar Rohit Bhargava the inventor of Social Media Optimization. In his article “The 5 Stages of Twitter Acceptance” Rohit has brilliantly and accurately outlined the evolution of many Twitter users. The graphic clearly highlights each stage and it acts as a measuring tool to those who have progressed forward in their acceptance.

The 5 Stages of Twitter Acceptance:

Imb_5stagesoftwitter_2
Courtesy RohitBhargava.typepad.com

My Acceptance Process for Each Level

1. Denial: One of my first blog posts of the summer of 2007 was to challenge Twitter’s validity as a tool-I instead described it ” Twitter becomes the equivilent of your well meaning but very nosy “Italian Grandmother.”

2. Presence: I simply went through the motions

3. Dumping: I inundated twitter with MY BLOG POSTS only a big no-no on any social networking site

4. Conversing: I reached the conversing stage 6 weeks ago as I really began to understand Twitter’s power 4 months ago. In this stage I knew I was progressing but I also knew something was missing-I was not a go-to objective source of information

5. Microblogging: I am now authentically building relationships 1×1, I am bringing in valuable information to the mix for other twitterers to ponder, and I am far more objective and willing to support the community