Job Seekers and Entrepreneurs: Drive Your Competition Crazy

Reality Check

“If any of my competitors were drowning, I’d stick a hose in their mouth.” Ray Kroc

Harsh words no doubt but if you have ever read about McDonald’s founder Ray Kroc they fit his personality. Unlike Mr. Kroc’s take no prisoners attitude, Guy Kawasaki suggests that the best way drive your competition crazy is by “constantly innovating and serving your customers.”

If you are a entrepreneur or a job seeker go buy Guy Kawsaki’s latest book “Reality Check.” Begin on Chapter 66 with “The Art of Driving Your Competition Crazy” for the best practical advice on how to stand out, be memorable, and create your differentiating factor. Also check out the blog for more information. Although there are 8 important steps worth serious consideration, one stands out as the theme of Kawasaki’s advice: Focus on the Customer.

Focus on the Customer:  Entrepreneur

The irony here is that rather than trying to do something to your competitor(s), “the best way to drive your competition crazy is not to do anything to it.” The strategy to success is to focus on your customer by concentrating on great customer service, out-innovating the competition, and out-pricing them.

Focus on the Hiring Manager: Job Seeker

In the same respects there is an irony in this situation too. Instead of the job seeker attempting to out sell, out brag, or out maneuver his/her resume to be the best resume, the job seeker needs to concentrate on the hiring manager’s happiness.

This happiness can be achieved by creating value through a blog, a great Linkedin profile, and a social media broadcasting system. The goal for job seekers should be to remove the resume review process, time lost, costly hours wasted by a hiring manager who does not want to go through this process. By making a valuable case and delivering a message of value through target marketing, job seekers could completely remove this burden from the hiring manager.

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Six Principles of Influence: Create Change That Benefits Your Customer

Influence is one of the most important factors in any business from the one-off entrepreneur to the largest global corporations. To understand the power of influence and persuasion, you must first understand the definition of influence.

The best definition is offered by one of the world’s leading experts on influence, persuasion, and negotiation Dr. Robert Cialdini as told in his interview for Guy Kawasaki’s great book “Reality Check.” Dr. Chialdini, a psychology professor at Arizona State University and Phd defines influence:

“Influence means creating change in some way. Change can be in an attitude, it can be in a perception, or a behavior. But in all instances, we can’t lay claim to influence until we can demonstrate that we’ve changed someone.”

Six Universal Principles of Influence

1. Reciprocation: People give back and treat you the same way you treat them

2. Scarcity: People are motivated to “seize the opportunities” of a limited offer that you provide to them if they realize the supply of this offer is rare or in dwindling availability

3. Authority: The greater your knowledge and credibility on a subject is the easier it is to persuade people

4. Commitment: People will feel the need and obligation to “comply with your request” if it is consistent with what they have publicly agreed (committed) to in your presence

5. Liking: The degree to which people know and like you is the main factor in their preference to say “yes” to you

6. Consensus: People love company in most decisions. If you give them evidence that others, just like them, have said yes to you, they then “will be likely” to say yes to you more often than not

The Zen of Presentations: Guy Kawasaki, Garr Reynolds, & The Health Brothers

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 12-23-08

Guy Kawasaki’s new book “Reality Check” has many brilliant, thought provoking, and important ideas to share. One of those ideas is from Garr Reynolds and it is called the Zen of Presentations. Presentation Zen “is about restraint, simplicity, and a natural approach to presentations that is appropriate for an age in which design thinking, story-telling, and right brain thinking are crucial complements to analysis, logic, and argument.

Reynolds goes on to identify PowerPoint as a crutch rather than a tool for presentations. My feeling is that powerpoint hinders the speakers ability to connect with the audience if used incorrectly; unfortunately the majority use it incorrectly.

The following from Marty Neumeier sums up my feelings quite well:

“PowerPoint has become a full-blown epidemic. Tragically, the victims are company values such as collaboration, innovation, passion, vision, and clarity. If you want smart buy-in, give PowerPoint a rest. Substitute more engaging techniques such as stories, demonstrations, drawings, prototypes, and brainstorming exercises. If a business is a decision factory, then the presentations that inform those decisions determine their quality: garbage in, garbage out.”

What makes a good presentation stick? According to the Health brothers, Chip and Dan, in their book “Made to Stick” sticky aka memorable messages share 6 common attributes:

1. Simplicity

2. Unexpectedness

3. Concreteness

4. Credibility

5. Emotions

6. Stories

Guy Kawasaki’s “Reality Check”: How Not to Choke

My Photo

Guy Kawasaki

In Guy Kawasaki’s wonderful book “Reality Check” we are treated to a two, that’s right 2, page chapter titled simply “How Not to Choke.” Choking may be the worst possible word to have attached to your career, athletic performance, and any moment that is meaningful in your life. To choke is to blow it by not having the nerve, losing your cool, blanking, freezing in the moment, or any number of horrific things a mind can do when it goes on lock down at the worst possible time. H3re are Guy’s ways to avoid choking.

Three Ways to Avoid Choking:

1. Avoid Negative People: stay away from negative people because what they say about you “can lead to you becoming what people say about you.”  Guy’s advice is to simply avoid them or “create product and serve them like hell.”

2. Invoke Positive Stereotypes: Positivity can “enhance performance.” Guy notes that Silicon Valley is a fantastic place for young people to start companies and that the “wunderkind” tag is a great example of a positive stereotype.

3. Frame or Reframe Yourself: Guy quotes Dr. George Lakoff  “you can control which groups identify with and the strength of that association.”

In essence the company you keep, the attitude you exude, and the perception you create are the most powerful ways to avoid choking in any situation. If you want more great advice, check out Guy’s favorite books. For even more great information, investigate Alltop.com Guy’s latest user content resource.

6 Key Transition Questions To Ask Yourself In Between Jobs

Reuters.com published this deansguide article August 9, 2008

The following is content from author Susan Hanshaw and her new book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live” a self help book that enables “you to become your own life coach.” Debra Costner’s Bay Area Business Woman newspaper, Backdoorjobs.com, and the Modernwomansdivorceguide.com have all contributed excellent reviews for Susan Hanshaw’s work:

Being in between jobs doesn’t have to be experienced like the kiss of death. I know that it is natural to feel very vulnerable, yet that is what being in transition is all about. It’s the very point that you are temporarily unattached to a job that provides you with a rare freedom to ask yourself what you really want from your next adventure.

Key Questions to Ask Yourself In Between Jobs

1. How Soon Do I Really Have to Land a Job?

2. Can I afford some time to step back and evaluate what I really want from my career?

Now is the time I may have the freedom and time to prepare for it

Note: Sure, it’s no fun watching your life savings take a downward climb, but is your time here really about the money?

3. Am I at a point in my life where I can afford to spend some time being selective about my next step or preparing for a new path?

Think of your career choices now as investments in your quality of life.

4. Would the jobs I am now searching for be my top choices if I were just starting out?

You spend a majority of your waking hours at your job. Consider it like you would a romantic relationship. Are you willing to settle for second best just to be committed?

5. Is it possible to support myself financially doing what I love?

Make a list of all the different ways you can generate income by doing what you love. Your financial support does not have to come from one income stream. Maybe one single role can’t generate enough money, but adding other roles that express your passions might make the necessary difference.

6. Are credentials getting in my way of going for jobs I really want?

Ask yourself if you are truly lacking what is necessary, or if credentials are a convenient excuse to protect you from risk or rejection. Research the kinds of credentials that others doing similar work have. If you don’t have what it takes, identify sources that can provide the appropriate credentials. Don’t make assumptions without checking the facts about the true requirements to do the work.

www.innerarchitect.com

Guy Kawasaki’s “Unfair Advantage” For Realtors: Create Your Writing Platform

Guy Kawasaki asks the eternal question of business owners, entrepreneurs, and corporations when he says “What is your unfair advantage?” Simply put what makes you or your business so special that your competition can not or will not compete with you.

In the real estate niche, the majority of Realtors point to the same “differentiating factors” when attempting to create a perception of a unfair advantage. Some Realtors claim their experience and customer service are “unfair advantages” over their competition. Yet the fact remains that there are thousands of Realtors with great experience and superior customer service.

“Unfair Advantage #1: Writing”

Creating a writing platform within your business is a major “unfair advantage” when you consider the number of Realtors who do not consistently utilize this strategy. Separate yourself and your business by creating all of the following tools:

1. Blog- The most powerful writing tool for your “next generation” marketing campaign, lead generation, SEO tool, and exposure is the blog. Whether you like the idea or not, blogs are here to stay. First adopters will reap the search engine optimization benefits while those Realtors that refuse to blog will be left off line in world this online. Eventually you will immerse yourself in Web 2.0 “social networking” via Digg, Reddit, delicious, stumbleupon, twitter, facebook, LinkedIn, Plaxo, friendfeed, and other social bookmarking or sharing sites

2. Freelance Contributor- Hone your writing skills first by practicing on your blog. Then contact your local newspapers, trade association, affiliates, community groups, rotaries, Kiwanis Clubs, investment clubs, church groups, and any other local organizations and offer to do a guest column

3. Newsletter- Create a newsletter for delivery EVERY OTHER week (no more-no less). Ask for permission (permission marketing) to deliver your newsletter via email to your list (those who have opted in to be on your list of course)

Tone for your newsletter is simple-valuable free information on a continuous basis asking for NOTHING in return from your readers. Write short succinct articles (2-4 paragraphs) like Top 10 lists, how to guides, tips, or resource listings

Proof This Works

You need not go any further than the following list of blogger-Realtors/affiliates for the reasons why you should be creating a writing platform within your business. Most of these people have either written or stated that blogging (writing) has changed their life and their business in such positive and profound ways.

1. Brian Brady www.mortgageratesreport.com
2. Tom Royce http://therealestatebloggers.com
3. Ardel’s www.searchingseattleblog.com/
4. Athol Kay’s http://reagentinct.com/about-page/
5. Marlow Harris http://360digest.com/
6. John Harper’s http://www.theharperteam.com/blog
7. Teresa Boardman http://www.stpaulrealestateblog.com/
8. Dustin and the gang at http://www.raincityguide.com/about/
9. Joshua Dorkin http://www.biggerpockets.com/renewsblog/contributors/
10. Kevin Boer http://3oceansrealestate.com/blog/

11. And me dean https://deansguide.wordpress.com and innerarchitect.com

Reuters.com Publishes Inner Architect Book Review: “She Is Writing This So I Can Be My Own Life Coach”


inner architect book cover

Awareness continues to build for author Susan Hanshaw’s new work “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live” with global media giant Reuters.com publishing Lori Hoeck’s amazing review July 3, 2008 at Spaceagesage.com blog.

The original story was published on June 24, 2008 as a deansguide article: “Smashing Review For Inner Architect: She Is Writing This So I Can Be My Own Life Coach.” Reuters.com syndicated the story for their News and Environment sections at Reuters.com

Live Workshops and Keynotes For Inner Architect

1. Mill Valley Rotary Club July 22, 2008

2. Sausalito Rotary Club July 24, 2008

3. Cupertino CSIX Connect Employment July 29, 2008

4. Fremont ProNet Employment August 15, 2008

5. San Francisco pow.wow networking August 19, 2008

6. Menlo Park Job Train Graduation September 5, 2008

7. Menlo Park Workshop: “Changing Careers: Laying Your Foundation”

Date: Saturday, Sept 6, 2008
Time: 10am – 4pm
Location
: Menlo Park, CA
Workshop price before Aug 6: $85
Workshop price after Aug 6: $95