Twitter: Web 2.0 Definition of Architecture of Participation

tim-oreilly

Tim O’Reilly the 2005 architect of the now famous definition of Web 2.0 foreshadowed the coming of the paradigm shift in media we are now seeing. The idea that individuals and companies could participate, collaborate, connect, and create is now in full swing–online.

Twitter: Micro Scale Example

Twitter’s social network is a solid example of an architecture of participation on a micro scale. Although it is not yet as functional as a blog, Twitter’s microblogging platform supports the architecture of participation:

  • Sharing links to resources
  • Developers creating open source tools for the Twitter community
  • Audio and Video links shared within the community
  • Collaboration between Twitterers in business, social, and political circles
  • Subculture of vernacular, semantics, and Twitter speak

O’Reilly’s mantra within his Web 2.0 definition should be the rallying cry manifesto for every entrepreneur, small business, and corporation: Creating network effects through an “architecture of participation.”

Us vs. Them

For companies like Intel, American Express, Clorox, and HP the power of microblogging, blogging and social networks produces:

  • Brand recognition
  • User participation
  • Measurement of message, products, and services
  • Viral opportunities
  • Reputation management
  • Breaking news opportunities
  • Communication and engagement with their audience
  • Crowdsourcing for new ideas

Conclusion: The Have “Nots” a Warning

For companies without a social media strategy, with no participation in social networks, and for those companies that do not publish a blog your time is coming. Your De-Evolution will take place as your competitors that are social media Web 2.0 first adopters and the second wave of adopters will fill the vacuum and void left by your lack of participation.

Worse yet, the consumer population looking for your brand online, within these social networks, will assume you don’t care about them or their concerns.

These consumers, made up of your current audience-clients and potential consumers, will hold conversations about your products and services. Some will compliment and evangelize your company-but you will never know it. Some will slam your brand, tell stories of dissatisfaction, and rant about your lack of participation-but you will never know it.

Advertisements

One thought on “Twitter: Web 2.0 Definition of Architecture of Participation

  1. Pingback: Top 10 Twitter Strategies for Realtors, Entrepreneurs, and Corporations « DeansGuide

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s