Twitter’s Practical Uses for Today’s Business: Health Care Industry

phil-bauman

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 3-10-09

Phil Bauman’s “140 Health Care Uses for Twitter” is a fantastic example of the sharing and brainstorming that is the power of social media and Web 2.0. This is a brilliant display of matching needs to solutions, giving value to those of us looking to understand how to utilize Twitter for practical business uses, and it provides a template for social media consultants when thinking of ways to use Twitter with other industries, niches, or specific company products or services.

Exercise for Consultants:

Examine Phil’s list and consider how you can create a list of uses for Twitter (or other social media tools):

  • Expert Knowledge: find an expert in the industry, niche, or business you are attempting to find Twitter uses for and learn as much as possible about your target
  • Examples: find examples of other industries or niches already successfully utilizing Twitter. What can you use from those methods that fit your target industry?
  • Ask, Ask, Ask: ask people what is practical or feasible. What Twitter functions will actually work and which ones are not suited for your target industry?

Phil’s 140 Heathcare Uses for Twitter:

  1. Tissue recruitment (for kidney and other organs, including blood)
  2. Epidemiological survey
  3. Disaster alerting and response
  4. Emergency response team management
  5. Supportive care for patients and family members
  6. Diabetes management (blood glucose tracking)
  7. Maintaining a personal health diary
  8. Adverse event reporting in the clinical setting and other pharmacovigilance functions
  9. Emitting critical laboratory values to nurses and physicians
  10. Alarming silent codes (psychiatric emergencies, security incidents)
  11. Drug safety alerts from the FDA
  12. Risk management communication
  13. Augmenting telemedicine
  14. Issuing Amber alerts
  15. Issuing alerts for missing nursing home residents
  16. Exercise management and encouragement
  17. Weight management and support
  18. Biomedical device data capture and reporting
  19. Nutritional diary and tracking
  20. Coordinating preoperative, perioperative and postoperative care (among pharmacy, nursing and surgical services)
  21. Medical service collaboration in the clinical setting
  22. Triage management in emergency rooms
  23. Census management/monitoring
  24. Arranging outpatient care
  25. Crowdsourcing for health care resources
  26. Shift-bidding for nurses and other health care professionals
  27. Mood tracking (for patients with bipolar and other mood disorders)
  28. Patient care reminders in the clinical setting
  29. Prescription management, including pharmacy refill reminders
  30. Daily health tips from authoritative sources
  31. Location awareness during crisis
  32. Occupational safety response
  33. Hazardous materials communication
  34. “Quick and dirty” diagnostic brainstorming between physicians (e.g. ’symptom clustering’)
  35. Clinical case education for (residents following attendings)
  36. Physician opinion-sharing
  37. Promoting Domestic Violence awareness
  38. Raising Child Abuse awareness
  39. USMLE preparation for medical licensing
  40. NCLEX for preparation for nursing licensing
  41. Recruitment of health care staff
  42. Alcohol and other substance abuse support
  43. Issuing doctor’s orders
  44. Environmental alerts: pollen counts, pollution levels, heat waves, severe weather alerts
  45. Remote wound care assistance
  46. Rural area health care communication
  47. Micro-sharing of pertinent patient information
  48. Micro-sharing of diagnostic results (blood tests, echocardiography, radiological images)
  49. Internal facility customer service (a hospital equivalent of @Comcastcares – c’mon hospitals!)
  50. Publishing health-related news
  51. Psychiatric “check-ins” for patients
  52. Nursing mentoring and collaboration
  53. Publishing disease-specific tips
  54. Childcare support
  55. Fund raising for hospitals and health-related causes
  56. Updating patient family members during procedures
  57. Live-tweeting surgical procedures for education
  58. Rare diseases tracking and and resource connection
  59. Reporting hospital staff injuries
  60. Tracking patient trends
  61. Tracking disease-specific trends
  62. Checking hospital ratings with other health care consumers
  63. Providing around-the-clock disease management
  64. Connecting genetic researchers with physicians
  65. Publishing the latest advances in biomedical devices
  66. Tracking antibiotic resistance
  67. Real-time satisfaction surveys with immediate follow-up for problem resolution
  68. Issuing asthma alerts
  69. Data collection for tracking facility patterns (process-performance, supply-chain and staffing problems)
  70. Live-tweeting medical conferences
  71. Keyword-tracking of health-related topics via Search.Twitter
  72. Posting quick nursing assessments that feed into electronic medical records (EMRs)
  73. Improving medical rounding systems
  74. Clinical trial awareness
  75. Hospital administration
  76. Sharing peer-to-peer reviews of articles of interest
  77. Connecting patients with similar disease processes
  78. Enhancing health-related support groups (e.g. buddy-systems for depression)
  79. Providing smoking cessation assistance
  80. Medical appliance support (e.g. at-home: colostomy care, infusion-pumps, wound-vacs)
  81. Reporting medical device malfunctions
  82. Tweeting updates to facility policies and procedures
  83. Arranging appointments with health care providers
  84. Product safety alerts
  85. Food safety alerts
  86. Information on women’s health
  87. Pain management
  88. Hospital reputation monitoring
  89. Publishing hospital-sponsored events in local communities
  90. Community health outreach
  91. Bioterrorism awareness and preparedness
  92. Issuing updates to hospital services to the public
  93. Insurance claim management
  94. Ethical, permission-based following of patients
  95. Micro-sharing consent for surgical and other procedures
  96. Patient-sharing of health-related experiences
  97. Posting ‘bread crumbs’ of facility experiences (”I had a bypass at this hospital and it went well but the food almost killed me.”)
  98. Patient searches for others confronting similar problems
  99. Stress management
  100. Mental health awareness
  101. Posting homeless shelter needs
  102. Food bank resource management
  103. Transmitting patient data to patients who are traveling abroad
  104. Generating streams of authoritative health care content online
  105. Exposing medical quakery
  106. Micro-sharing documentation for advanced medical directives
  107. Discussing public health care policy
  108. Developing stronger patient-provider relationships
  109. Tracking the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals
  110. Following health marketing
  111. Tracking influenza alerts from the CDC
  112. Exchanging/soliciting scientific validation of alternative health claims
  113. Following ad-hoc conferences on eHealth like HealthCampPhila
  114. Tracking toxic diseases
  115. Tracking HIV news
  116. Issuing/exchanging dietary tips
  117. Tweeting what you eat
  118. Comparing nursing home performance
  119. Coordinating clinical instruction
  120. Communicating with nursing supervisors
  121. Public safety announcements
  122. Tracking FDA guideline updates
  123. Tracking the progress of developing pharmaceuticals
  124. Broadcasting infant care tips to new parents
  125. Publishing vaccination/immunization services locations, hours and reminders
  126. Reporting adverse events to FDA (currently not available via Twitter: why not?)
  127. Obtaining information on Medicare and Medicaid
  128. Case management functions
  129. Clinical education coordination
  130. Facilitating patient-transfer processes
  131. Patient-information retrieval
  132. Reporting breeches of universal precautions in health care facilities
  133. Posting daily nursing tips
  134. Exchanging physician humor (we’re all human)
  135. Closing the digital divide with respect to health care information
  136. Coordinating allied health care services during patient admissions
  137. Coordinating patient discharges with all services
  138. Post-discharge patient consultations and follow-up care
  139. Helping device technicians to communicate directly with manufacturers
  140. Discussing HIPAA reform in the age of micro-sharing

2 Jeffrey Gitomer Resources for Jobs Seekers & Entrepreneurs

Jeffrey Gitomer is a best selling author, world class keynote speaker, and one of the most important resources available for job seekers and entrepreneurs today. Gitomer specializes in many important facets of business including business development, sales strategies, and networking. Yet it is one very simple concept, that remains one of the greatest takeaways I have learned in my business career. Jeffrey’s mantra “Give value before you receive value.” When you network with people he instructs people to give value, give it continously, and give value without asking for anything in return. Here are too very valuable resources that help people understand networking and the sales process:

1. Newsletter: Sales Caffeine

This is a fantastic resource. Jeffrey asks a weekly question that is both thought provoking and instructive.

Q: What is the most significant long-term benefit of successful networking?

A. You will not have to cold call to get new business

B. You will build business friendships and relationships

C. You will be able to use your contacts for sales and referrals

D. You can call people later and they will already know you

Answer is here

2. Books: “The Little Black Book of Connections: 6.5 Assets to Network Your Way to Rich Relationships

Gitomer has authored 12 books from customer loyatly and sales principles to persuasion and success. The most influential book I have ever read that changed my mind set and results is Jeffrey’s “The Little Black Book of Connections: 6.5 Assets to Network Your Way to Rich Relationships.” Here are some of the concepts that changed my business life:

  • How to give value constantly without asking for anything in return
  • How to become a go-to resource of value
  • How to research before networking
  • What to give first in order to create value for my networking partners
  • Why your network building is the most important concept that must be a continuous process throughout your business career
  • Understanding networking etiquette for different networking groups
  • What networking is NOT
  • Where to find the best resources to network
  • How to assess your networking efforts
  • How to stay connected and relevant in today’s networking environment

Realtor’s #1 Tool: Twitter The Social Media Broadcasting Tool With Power

Twitter.com

Reuters.com published this deansguide article October 21, 2008

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article October 21, 2008

The newest and most exciting strategy for Realtors who do not want to blog, refuse to blog, or feel they will never be able to handle the work schedule of a blogger have an alternative: leveraging Social Media sites. The #1 tool for exposure in Web 2.0 and for your business is establishing your writing platform via a blog. Yet the barrier to entry is often too high for people who don’t wish to keep up with the technology curve, research curve, avalanche of reading, and writing articles.

Social Media sites provide Realtors with the ability to create a strategy where you connect your profiles, writing, and media together within the system. This method provides added exposure, helps to create a persona, produces lead generation opportunities, and allows you to network on a global scale.

Strategies for twitter.com

This is one of the best site to utilize in my personal branding, my system of delivering my message, and my quest to create my differentiating factor:

1. Create: A succinct profile aka bio. This is your billboard and what attracts people to follow you if they have never read one of your “tweets.”

2. Follow people: Go to your most trusted twitter connection and “mine” their “following” list located on the right sidebar. This is exactly like mining a blogroll on a popular blog

3. People Search: Perform a people search and follow people in your industry

4. Company Search: Perform a company search and follow companies that are in your industry, competitors, niches that work with your niche

5. Direct Message: Send a direct message to someone you wish to connect with on twitter. Offer value, ask for feedback, provide your feedback, interact and collaborate

6. twitter Blog: Read the twitter blog for more tips and strategies

Free, sound bite sized at 140 characters, broadcasting messages sent real time with impact. In addition twitter is fast becoming one of the most powerful search engine optimized sites on the internet. Utilize twitter as one site to help defend your reputation while locking up the top 20 positions on a Google search of your name.

Job Seeker’s Employment Campaign: Differentiate and Brand “You”

Courtesy dotdoubledot at Flickr.com

Reuters.com published this deansguide article October 8, 2008

Now is the time to take action in this challenging and changing employment environment. If you are a job seeker, a soon to be laid off ex-employee, or someone simply worried about your job security, this message is for you. Your greatest strategy to employment is to utilize Web 2.0 tools, network within the Social Media system, and join the global conversation by establishing your own blog.

“Blogging to Employment” is a hands on powerful workshop that provides the job seeker the tool to showcase:

  • Differentiating Factor: Stand out from the non blogging job seekers
  • Knowledge to Expertise: Showcase your business intelligence and assets
  • Employment Campaign: Chronicle your search strategies and answer the hiring manager’s question: “What have you been doing during the past (insert your timeframe) to find employment?”
  • Writing Platform: Establish the brand “You”, improve your writing skills through practice, and create content that hiring managers want to see
  • New Skill Sets: Learn to blog and utilize Web 2.0 Social Media Systems
  • Networking: Network globally, within your niche, and to your local market
  • Google Presence: Manage your search placement by populating your top 2 pages on a Google query of your name or business name
  • Reputation Management: Respond, correct, or defend against erroneous information about you online
  • “Living” Resume: Position your blog as an extension of your resume, a landing page where you send people to view your current activities

4 Strategies to Employment

  • Scenario Solution: take on a company’s challenge, posit your solutions, or review actionable steps that showcase how you might solve their challenge
  • Promote Linkedin Profile: Place a Linkedin widget on your blog that links to your Linkedin profile; place a link within your profile on Linkedin to send readers back to your blog
  • Profile Linking: Link all your profiles on each Social Media site to one another. Also link from these profiles back to your blog
  • What Are You Doing Now?: Promote and tell the world about your employment campaign and writing by placing links on Linkedin and Twitter. Linkedin has a message board and twitter is a “what are you doing now” message board

Related Blogging Services:

Business Blogging Basics

Business Blogging Strategies

5 Strategies to Branding “You”: Realtor’s Guide To Career Success

Branding "You" to be memorable

Branding

Reuters.com published this deansguide article September 2, 2008

What exactly is the definition for the word “branding”? We are talking about creating an aura, a perception, and a truth about a person, service, or product that allows people to identify and recognize them instantly.

Branding according to Whatis.techtarget.com definition

Branding “You” What Are You Waiting For?

You spend a lifetime promoting your employer, their products, and their services. You derive your substance factor from your experiences. Is it not about time you tell the world about you and why you are special?

Tips To Branding “You”

1. Recognize: You are a brand. You have recognizable qualities and you must consider yourself special in order to promote your unique qualities

2. Begin the Shift: Recognize you are worthy of brand recognition and begin to shift the emphasis to your qualities and differentiating factors that make you unique. Why are you so effective? How can you deliver value? Begin to market you as the source

3. Education to Expertise: in order to become a brand, you must be knowledgeable in your niche. Gain confidence and expertise by studying and learning about your business from mentors, online resources, workshops, seminars, and books. Building your knowledge base builds confidence in you as well as your potential clients

4. Writing Platform: create a writing platform with the goal of establishing your own blog within a 3-6 month period. The following are places to start:

a.) Submit articles to ezinearticles.com

b.) Create a newsletter

c.) Become a contributor to a blog

d.) Ask to contribute to a newsletter or local newspaper

5. Public Speaking Platform: Create a workshop or speech aimed at providing value to your audience.

a.) Ask to represent your company at local meetings or conferences. Work up to bigger venues

b.) Ask to speak at your Kiwanis Club, Rotary, or Chamber of Commerce

c.) Create a Free workshop for you affiliate partners

d.) Join a industry organization and submit your request to speak

Results

The best strategy to support your career as an entrepreneur or as an employee of a company is to create the brand of “You.” In so doing, you become recognizable to both potential clients and potential employers.

Your entrepreneurial business is positively effected when potential clients know you, like your brand (You), and understand the value you bring to the table

Your employer’s business is positively effected when customers know you, trust you as their “brand”, and understand the value you bring to the organization you are working for with the client’s best interests in mind

SEO Mistakes Bloggers Make Presentation Highlights WordCamp 2008

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article August 19, 2008

WordPress WordCamp 2008 in San Francisco was broken down into two separate programs one for users (User Track) and one for developers (Developer Track). Since the only code I have written was on a old “Get Smart” decoder ring, I was upstairs with the users. The programs were broken up into 20-30-60 minute sessions; the first significant session was Stephan Spencer’s “SEO Mistakes Most Bloggers Make.”

The following is a very abbreviated version of the ppt presentation provided for you. Take your time and absorb as much as possible using this post as an “appetizer” to the main course

SEO Mistakes Most Bloggers Make by Stephan Spencer

With the fondest of memories, Stephan Spencer’s session was a full blast steam roller of terminology, technical strategies, and examples. It was like trying to follow that once famous T.V. pitchman the “Fast Talker” through the backroom of the SEO underworld. Spencer is obviously a brilliant man with expertise at the highest level in the SEO world–no arguing the source, this guy is a Babe Ruth in his field

The full ppt of Stephan’s presentation is here for those who are looking for incredible detail and great strategies.

A Few Mistakes Not To Make

1. Allowing Title Tags to be “auto-generated” by your blogging software is a mistake

Solution: Handcraft your title tags and never allow your blog’s name to be attached to the beginning of your post title or category tag

2. Multiple Homes for your blog is a huge mistake

Solution: You do not want to your pages attached to multiple urls-only one url. Make sure each page has one url that the search engines recognize as the place to go for that particular page or you will be fragmenting your SEO power for that page

3. Date Based Archive reliance hurts your SEO and most blog platform software organizes your pages by date

Solution: Internal organization of your blog content into categories as well as “implementing tagging and tag clouds across your blog is a much more search engine optimal approach.”

4. Only One RSS Feed for your blog and it is not optimized

Solution: Each category on your blog should have it’s own RSS feed so that people only interested in a certain topic can subscribe to that topic and get only the information they want rather than the entire blog. If you utilize tag pages then you should have an RSS tag specific feeds

5. Placing Your Blog url or RSS Feed url on a blog domain you do not own. This one is especially painful because I am on a wordpress.com subdomain rather than my own domain I own. Eventually I will have to abandon my deansguide.wordpress.com so that I can control my adsense or advertising revenue

Solution: Bite the bullet and start a stand alone blog with a domain you own. Anything less means you don’t control your possible income or rules of engagement

For a complete list of the mistakes and fixes, please reference Stephan’s ppt presentation