Job Seeker’s Procrastinating: Start Job Search By Building Your Network

Since moving away from the employment niche as our focus, I have written sparingly about how to leverage social media in a job search. Although the evidence is overwhelmingly in favor of job seekers blogging and leveraging social media, many job seekers remain unmoved.

For all of the nay saying job seekers who believe a resume is enough to land a job in today’s world, we point to Chapter 71 “Career Guidance for This Century” from Guy Kawasaki’s “Reality Check.” Penelope Trunk the author of “Brazen Careerist: The New Rules For Success” provides the nine biggest myths of the workplace.

The Nine Biggest Myths of the Workplace: #6 You Need a Good Resume

According to Penelope:

  • Resumes: only 10% of jobs come from sending a blind resume
  • Networks: most people get jobs by leveraging their network
  • Resume vs. Network: you need a competent resume that will showcase the fact that there are no red flags in your history BUT it is your network of people, connections, and audience that will be the reason you find a job-not the resume

Twitter’s Conversational Search: The Search Google and Facebook Seek to Emulate?

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 3- 18-09

The new buzzword in the world of search, and a concept being posited as the downfall of Google, is “conversational search.” The idea being that searching within Twitter, Linkedin, or other social media network search engines is a more robust and valuable search strategy than utilizing Google search. The thought is that the search results on Twitter could lead the searcher to conversation(s) that provide more targeted information, possibility of immediate communication, and feedback.

The following is a retrospective look at our original Twitter case study that highlighted David Murray’s successful job search utilizing Twitter.com as his main tool. Within Dave’s strategy were 5 major tips that any job seeker can use to begin the process of delivering their value to their strategically targeted audience(s). This is a fantastic case study for the value of conversational search: injecting yourself into your desired conversation resulting in an opportunity.

The case study of David Murray written by David Meerman Scott is a powerful example of how to utilize Twitter in your employment campaign. The article “How David Murray Found a New Job via Twitter” provides 5 advanced tips that are very important to consider—if you plan to utilize this free broadcasting tool:

  1. Use Twitter: This sounds easy but the first step is to recognize that if you want to stand apart, you need to begin to utilize social media tools your competitors may not be using–yet.
  2. Create Keyword List: List all of the keywords for the company, industry, people, and niche you wish to “follow” on Twitter. An example of David’s keyword list: “Social media jobs”, “Online Community Manager”, “Blogging jobs”, “Hiring social media”, and other keywords that fit his job search criteria.
  3. Twitter Search: Twitter Search is an internal search engine that you will input your keywords into to find conversations by people who are connected to the industry, jobs, companies, and niches you wish to contact.
  4. Google Reader: David then pulled the RSS feeds of his keyword conversations into Google Reader and “made it a habit to check these first thing in the morning every day.”
  5. Introduce Yourself: David found conversations related to his job interests and he “took the liberty of introducing himself via Twitter.”

The Results: David was hired as “Assistant Webmaster, Client Services for The Bivings Group.” And as David states “Many times when inquiring about the open positions, the jobs had not been officially posted” and “How cool that on Twitter you can express interest in a job opportunity that hasn’t even been announced yet?”

Job Seeker’s List of Top 25 Social Media Networks

The Chicago Sun-Times published this deansguide article 2-10-09

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 2-10-09

In the first article in this series aimed at helping job seekers and entrepreneurs, I chronicled how not to organize your work day. I then provided a template for how to organize your day in the world of social media. The response has been overwhelming. People are demanding a list of the best social media sites aka social media networks available today.

The following is a list of the top 25 social media “networks” as ranked by traffic (visits per month) in a great retrospective article by Andy Kazeniac of Compete.com “Social Networks: Facebook Takes Over the Top Spot, Twitter Climbs.” This is a retro look at Andy’s original ranking of the Top 25 last year.  Note: Twitter came in at #22 on that list–look at them today.

Top 25 Social Media Networks:

Courtesy of Compete.com:

Analysis:

If you are a job seeker you should be concentrating your efforts on establishing a strong presence on #5 Linkedin.com and #3 Twitter.com. Although Facebook.com is #1, it has more cache for entrepreneurs looking to capture audience for a product or service.

A Job Seeker’s Day In The World of Social Media

Chicago Sun-Times published this deansguide article 2-08-09

In my post “Job Seekers How Do You Organize Your Day?” I ask the reader to identify whether they were making 10 mistakes  in their job search. As a follow up to this article I want to outline a day in the life of a job seeker who utilizes social media for their job search efforts. No resumes are sent in the making of this day-just value.

Daily Structure for Job Seekers Utilizing Social Media

1. 8:00am Check email:

2. 8:30am Check Google Reader:  Job Seekers should have their feed reader filled with the following resources:

a.) Blogs authored by companies that are on your company target list
b.) Linkedin Q&A, where you can follow relevant information to your targeted niche
c.) Blogs authored by associations or networking blogs within your field of interest
d.) Twitter feeds from recruiters, career strategists, and your local job market news agencies

3. 9:30am Linkedin: Create a new message in the “What are you working on” tool on your home page. This tool provides exposure of your activities to your entire network:

deans-linkedin-twitter-box

4.  9:45am Linkedin: Ask or Answer a Question to demonstrate your expertise

5.  10:30am Blog:  Check your blog stats, answer any comments, monitor traffic for each blog article within the last week, check keyword and Referrers sections

6.  11:00am Write Article: Choose a subject from the research you performed in your Google Reader and email check.

7.  11:45am Lunch-Twitter: Broadcast your new article & mine for article resources

8.  12:45pm Social Media Networking: Deliver your value by leaving link(s) to your article(s) on your targeted company’s blog(s), mass media blogs, industry association sites, and influential blogs comment sections. Ex below Ryan Phillipenko left a link (in red) to his blog .

deans-comment-ex

9.  2:00pm Check Email-Twitter: Return all messages and reach out to one new contact

10. 2:30pm Research Networking: Look for offline networking meetings, events, meetups, tweetups, and charity events

11.  3:30pm Cold Calls: Call your network and offer your value. Offer to volunteer, provide free services, or offer any breaking news or resources that will help your networking partners

12.  4:00pm Twitter: Tweet your latest article, leave at least 5 new messages with valuable resource links, connect via conversation with at least 3 new people

13. 4:45pm Review Monster.com & Careerbuilder.com: stay connected to these sites

14. 5:15pm  Linkedin Answer Follow up: Look for follow up to questions that are niche specific to your job search.

15. 5:45pm  Read One Social Media Blog: Read at least one current article from social media experts Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Peter Kim, Pat Kitano, or InnerArchitect

Job Seekers How Do You Organize Your Day?

Foxbusiness.com published this deansguide article 2-03-09

If you are currently a job seeker, how do you organize your day? Do you have a plan? What tasks make up the plan that you execute on a daily basis? Do you have enough to do so that your job of finding a job is a fulltime job?

Is This You and Your Job Search Effort?

1. You are utilizing a resume as your #1 marketing tool

2. You are not utilizing social media

3. You are utilizing social media without an understanding of the strategies

4. You are email spamming your network with requests

5. You only respond to job listings or word of mouth aka “response mode”

6. You attend networking events without doing research to understand the organization, who may attend, or what the expected etiquette demands from each event

7. You are working less than 8 hrs per day on your job search and can not imagine having enough tasks to perform to fill a full work day.

8. You do not give value first

9. You are not delivering your value first before your resume

10. You are not learning and adding new skills to your current skill set

If you recognize any, a portion, or all of this list as what you are currently doing in your job search, then it is time to consider a change. Unless what you are doing is working for you, stay tuned as I will  outline and describe a job seeker’s day in the world of social media.

Job Seekers and Entrepreneurs: Deliver Your Value First Through Social Media Revolution

Susan and I presented our workshop “Web 2.0’s Impact on Job Seekers: The Changing Roles of the Resume, Job Search, and Job Seeker” at CSIX this past Tuesday to a packed house of over 110 hopeful job seekers. As we settled into facilitating this workshop, we realized that for the first time we were about to present our complete thesis and theme.

Step 1

The most important step for job seekers and entrepreneurs is the understanding that you must deliver your value first, deliver it often, and deliver it to your strategically targeted audience.

“Hiring managers are using the Internet to get a more well-rounded view of job candidates in terms of their skills, accomplishments, and overall fit within the company”Rosemary Haefner Vice President of Human Resource Careerbuilder.com

We have been supporting blogging as a more powerful and proactive “living” resume since June of 2008. Yet Tuesday was our first opportunity to evangelize the emergence of a paradigm shift, where social media tools and Web 2.0 strategies replaced the resume, as a job seeker’s main marketing tool.

Web 2.0 Paradigm Shift in Communications

The decades of mass media dominance and stranglehold over the control and flow of information is waning. Today is the greatest time in human history for communication, connectivity, collaboration, networking, and delivering your message of value, expertise, and experience to your strategicially targeted hiring managers and companies.

There is a global conversation going on between bloggers, people networking and finding opportunities on Linkedin, resources and messages being broadcast on Twitter, and companies searching for human capital talent throughout the social media stratosphere.

Companies Adopting Web 2.0 and Blogs: Tools to Promote Business

Our friend and blogger Ray Schiel, of globalsocialmedianetwork.com, has produced a massive resource page that outlines the participation of 105 major corporations in blogging, 64 on Facebook pages, 12 podcasting, 12 crowdsourcing sites, and 100’s of companies microblogging on Twitter.

Job Seekers’ Tip: These social media tools are being used by major corporations to promote their products, services, and business practices. If you want to connect with your target company, and they utilize social media tools, then this is a major opportunity to connect as well as demonstrate your understanding of their efforts.

Companies Monitoring Web 2.0 and Social Media: Screening and Hiring Practices

Not only are major corporations utilizing these tools for their own business practices, they are using them to find new talent and perform due diligence on potential applicants. Computer World’s “One in Five Employers Uses Social Networks in Hiring Process” outlines a Careerbuilder.com survey of 31,000 employers. The results are very compelling:

1.  24% of hiring managers “found content on social networks that helped convince them to hire a candidate.” In addition hiring managers said that “profiles showing a professional image and solid references can boost a candidates chances for a job.”

2.  22% of the 31,000 employers said they “peruse social networks to screen candidates.”

3.  9% more of the 31,000 employers said they are planning to do so

4.  A total of 9,600 employers are going to search for candidates and perform due diligence rather than rely on resumes to tell a job seekers story

Deliver Your Value First

The conclusion is that job seekers must deliver their value first before attempting to deliver their resume. Social media and Web 2.0 are changing job search. The resume is no longer a job seeker’s marketing tool. It is up to job seekers, in this very rough job market, to utilize these tools in order to stand apart and become memorable.

Tips for Entrepreneurs: How Do You Work on the Road?

Chefs.com published this deansguide article 1-14-09

Special welcome to Chefs.com as a new publisher of deansguide content. Thank you and welcome!

What does a networking day look like to you? I drive 150 miles round trip to network in Silicon Valley one to two days a week. The following are tips on how to develop your day, on the fly, when things change unexpectedly. The first scenario represents my original plans for my day. The second scenario is the reality that was my day.

Road Tips to Save Time, Educate, and Accomplish Tasks

1. Practice Time: I practice one of my 5 workshop presentations on the 60 minute drive to the Valley. It is quiet time and a great place to practice

2. GPS: A GPS system for your car is a simple tool to keep you from losing time consulting your iPhone or laptop in search of directions.

3. Buffer and Flexibility: Schedule enough time between events, sales calls, or appointments so that you can reconnect with business tasks, call backs, and keep your day moving on all fronts of your business.

4. Give Value : Be prepared to give files, printed materials, articles, and any reference resources when you are making sales calls, new consultations, networking events, or any other place you wish to give value or support your points.

5. Be Ready for Opportunity: Be ready to present your case, workshop, or product at the drop of a hat.

My Schedule Before the Day

1. 10:00am-1:30pm  CSIX Connect: This is the best employment group meeting in the Valley. The meeting runs from 10:30-1:00 at the iRestaurant in Cupertino. It includes lunch, networking, and speaker’s workshop. This is stop #1 in my day.

2. 2:00 and 3:00pm Consultations: I scheduled two consultations after the CSIX meeting.Both of my consultations centered around current clients’ needs and my need for an evaluation of their efforts to date.

3.  3:30pm Sales Call: ProMatch is a large Edd group in Sunnyvale that Susan has presented to in the past. My goal is to secure a speaking engagement on blogging to employment, Linkedin, Twitter or any social media Web 2.0 subject.

4.  4:30pm Administration: Send follow up documents and monitor our blog.

5.  5:30pm De Anza Community College: Inquire about facility rental, sales call, schedule meeting to pitch social media curriculum.

6.  6:30-7:00pm: Final call backs, wait for rush hour to thin begin home at 7:00pm

My Actual Day

1. 10:00am-3:00pm CSIX Connect: I met 7 new contacts and our lunch conversation continued until 2:00.

2.  3:00-3:45pm New Consultation: I met with a new contact to discuss social media for job seekers

3.  4:00-5:00pm New Consultation: I met with a new contact to discuss change, transition, and understanding direction.

4.  ProMatch: my opportunity to reconnect with my contacts at ProMatch is gone as they close at 4:00pm

5.  5:20pm Phone Consultation: In coming call from former client to reevaluate past issues. New focus and strategy discussed. Invite to attend ASTD monthly meeting.

6.  6:00-8:00pm ASTD “Mentoring” : Kim Wise gave a very interesting presentation on the benefits of mentoring to companies and individuals, software developed for mentor selection, and her vision of future trends in organizational development.



Job Seeker’s Guide to Making the Hiring Manager Happy

Careerbuilder.com ran a survey of 31,000 employers about their use of social media in screening and finding job applicants. The results include:

  • More than 1 in 5 employers use social media sites to screen job applicants
  • 22% of the 31,000 employers said they use social media to find human capital
  • 9% more said they would begin utilizing social media sites in 2009
  • 31% or nearly 10,000 employers will focus on social media as a recruiting and screening tool in 2009

The writing, pardon the pun, is on the wall. If you want to make a hiring manager happy, and help yourself, you will adopt all of the steps outlined below to help you–stand apart from the competition.

Silicon Valley star Guy Kawasaki did not intend for his chapter “The Art of Driving Your Competition Crazy” in Reality Check to be job seeker’s advice; yet the main theme is vital for any job seeker’s success. The chapter outlines 8 steps to drive your competition crazy aimed at helping entrepreneurs and corporations understand how to win at the art of business.The most valuable theme and step is “Focus on the customer.” Guy outlines the irony that entrepreneurs and businesses should not take action against the competition–don’t do anything to them but everything for the customer.

Theme: Make the Hiring Manager Happy

The idea and theme here is to ignore your competition and focus completely on a hiring manager’s happiness. Ignore the millions who are out of work and competing for the same jobs, ignore the pundits who continue to fuel the panic, ignore the negative naysayers who continue to bring your spirit down.

Instead think about what makes hiring managers happy? How about taking the task of reading resumes off their plate. What about saving them time, energy, and focus by removing the screening process that entails resumes and cover letters. Why not remove the gray areas and guess work for a hiring manager by delivering a better more revealing resource than a resume which is simply a job seeker’s listing of their value? How about removing the issue of back checking aka background checks to validate claims on a resume? Why not attempt to reduce their time wasted recruiting and looking for the right candidate for the job when you are available?

Most Hiring Managers Dislike:

  • Deluge of resumes create huge time crunch
  • Lost productivity in their own jobs due to resume review process
  • Tasking other people from their jobs to help in the review of resumes
  • Guess work involved in hoping they choose the right candidate
  • Decisions about new hires ultimately reflect upon the hiring manager’s own judgment
  • Lack of information or verifiable proof that job seeker can deliver their listed values in their resume

Make a Hiring Manager Happy:

  • Craft your value message of expertise, accomplishments, and experience
  • Establish your “employment campaign” blog that delivers your value message
  • Research how you can provide value to targeted hiring managers then deliver your value message
  • Write a keyword rich, descriptive, and opportunity message Linkedin profile
  • Utilize Twitter to broadcast and deliver your value message
  • Research your target companies for their participation in Web 2.0 blogging, social media networking, and engage them through these channel

Job Seekers Become Memorable Through Influence

Beacon News member of the Chicago Sun-Times newsgroup published this deansguide article 1-06-09

Chicago Sun-Times published this deansguide article 1-06-09

The most compelling need for job seekers today, in one of the most highly competitive job markets in history, is to be memorable. If you do not stand out and differentiate yourself from your competition, your search progress will be delayed–indefinitely.

What is influence and how does it pertain to your job search? If you are looking for ways to stand apart from the over crowded human capital pool, consider your abilities to influence others. In today’s job market, winning that coveted interview leading to a job requires the job seeker to become a target marketer.

But even with the best research, including desired companies and hiring managers, job seekers must be able to influence people in order to capture the interview leading to that desired position.

What is Influence?

In his interview for Guy Kawasaki’s fantastic must read “Reality Check”, Dr. Robert Cialdini PhD, Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University, and one of the world’s leading experts on persuasion, compliance, and negotiation defines influence:

“Influence means creating change in some way. Change can be in an attitude, it can be in a perception, or a behavior. But in all instances, we can’t lay claim to influence until we can demonstrate we have changed someone.”

Influence a “Science” for All

According to Dr. Cialdini the good news about influence is that it is no longer just for certain “gifted” individuals. Instead Cialdini insists:

“For centuries, the ability to be influential and persuasive has been thought of as an art, but there’s also a science to it. And if it’s scientific, it can be taught. It can be learned. So we all have the potential to become more influential.”

Influence Your Job Search

With the trend for job search turning to proactive target marketing and social media tools within an employment campaign, the natural progression for a job seeker is influence. How to influence hiring managers and persuade companies to give you a interview is the ultimate goal.

The true reality check is the fact that a Web 1.0 resume, with no measurement capabilities, is not the answer in today’s job market. The old method of response mode marketing via a resume must be replaced by a Web 2.0 employment campaign strategy.


Realtors Do You Understand the 5 Levels of Twitter Acceptance?

One of the best tools for measuring your commitment and understanding of the micro-blogging power Twitter.com comes from social media marketing superstar Rohit Bhargava the inventor of Social Media Optimization. In his article “The 5 Stages of Twitter Acceptance” Rohit has brilliantly and accurately outlined the evolution of many Twitter users. The graphic clearly highlights each stage and it acts as a measuring tool to those who have progressed forward in their acceptance.

The 5 Stages of Twitter Acceptance:

Imb_5stagesoftwitter_2
Courtesy RohitBhargava.typepad.com

My Acceptance Process for Each Level

1. Denial: One of my first blog posts of the summer of 2007 was to challenge Twitter’s validity as a tool-I instead described it ” Twitter becomes the equivilent of your well meaning but very nosy “Italian Grandmother.”

2. Presence: I simply went through the motions

3. Dumping: I inundated twitter with MY BLOG POSTS only a big no-no on any social networking site

4. Conversing: I reached the conversing stage 6 weeks ago as I really began to understand Twitter’s power 4 months ago. In this stage I knew I was progressing but I also knew something was missing-I was not a go-to objective source of information

5. Microblogging: I am now authentically building relationships 1×1, I am bringing in valuable information to the mix for other twitterers to ponder, and I am far more objective and willing to support the community