Twitter’s Practical Uses for Today’s Business: Health Care Industry

phil-bauman

FoxBusiness.com published this deansguide article 3-10-09

Phil Bauman’s “140 Health Care Uses for Twitter” is a fantastic example of the sharing and brainstorming that is the power of social media and Web 2.0. This is a brilliant display of matching needs to solutions, giving value to those of us looking to understand how to utilize Twitter for practical business uses, and it provides a template for social media consultants when thinking of ways to use Twitter with other industries, niches, or specific company products or services.

Exercise for Consultants:

Examine Phil’s list and consider how you can create a list of uses for Twitter (or other social media tools):

  • Expert Knowledge: find an expert in the industry, niche, or business you are attempting to find Twitter uses for and learn as much as possible about your target
  • Examples: find examples of other industries or niches already successfully utilizing Twitter. What can you use from those methods that fit your target industry?
  • Ask, Ask, Ask: ask people what is practical or feasible. What Twitter functions will actually work and which ones are not suited for your target industry?

Phil’s 140 Heathcare Uses for Twitter:

  1. Tissue recruitment (for kidney and other organs, including blood)
  2. Epidemiological survey
  3. Disaster alerting and response
  4. Emergency response team management
  5. Supportive care for patients and family members
  6. Diabetes management (blood glucose tracking)
  7. Maintaining a personal health diary
  8. Adverse event reporting in the clinical setting and other pharmacovigilance functions
  9. Emitting critical laboratory values to nurses and physicians
  10. Alarming silent codes (psychiatric emergencies, security incidents)
  11. Drug safety alerts from the FDA
  12. Risk management communication
  13. Augmenting telemedicine
  14. Issuing Amber alerts
  15. Issuing alerts for missing nursing home residents
  16. Exercise management and encouragement
  17. Weight management and support
  18. Biomedical device data capture and reporting
  19. Nutritional diary and tracking
  20. Coordinating preoperative, perioperative and postoperative care (among pharmacy, nursing and surgical services)
  21. Medical service collaboration in the clinical setting
  22. Triage management in emergency rooms
  23. Census management/monitoring
  24. Arranging outpatient care
  25. Crowdsourcing for health care resources
  26. Shift-bidding for nurses and other health care professionals
  27. Mood tracking (for patients with bipolar and other mood disorders)
  28. Patient care reminders in the clinical setting
  29. Prescription management, including pharmacy refill reminders
  30. Daily health tips from authoritative sources
  31. Location awareness during crisis
  32. Occupational safety response
  33. Hazardous materials communication
  34. “Quick and dirty” diagnostic brainstorming between physicians (e.g. ’symptom clustering’)
  35. Clinical case education for (residents following attendings)
  36. Physician opinion-sharing
  37. Promoting Domestic Violence awareness
  38. Raising Child Abuse awareness
  39. USMLE preparation for medical licensing
  40. NCLEX for preparation for nursing licensing
  41. Recruitment of health care staff
  42. Alcohol and other substance abuse support
  43. Issuing doctor’s orders
  44. Environmental alerts: pollen counts, pollution levels, heat waves, severe weather alerts
  45. Remote wound care assistance
  46. Rural area health care communication
  47. Micro-sharing of pertinent patient information
  48. Micro-sharing of diagnostic results (blood tests, echocardiography, radiological images)
  49. Internal facility customer service (a hospital equivalent of @Comcastcares – c’mon hospitals!)
  50. Publishing health-related news
  51. Psychiatric “check-ins” for patients
  52. Nursing mentoring and collaboration
  53. Publishing disease-specific tips
  54. Childcare support
  55. Fund raising for hospitals and health-related causes
  56. Updating patient family members during procedures
  57. Live-tweeting surgical procedures for education
  58. Rare diseases tracking and and resource connection
  59. Reporting hospital staff injuries
  60. Tracking patient trends
  61. Tracking disease-specific trends
  62. Checking hospital ratings with other health care consumers
  63. Providing around-the-clock disease management
  64. Connecting genetic researchers with physicians
  65. Publishing the latest advances in biomedical devices
  66. Tracking antibiotic resistance
  67. Real-time satisfaction surveys with immediate follow-up for problem resolution
  68. Issuing asthma alerts
  69. Data collection for tracking facility patterns (process-performance, supply-chain and staffing problems)
  70. Live-tweeting medical conferences
  71. Keyword-tracking of health-related topics via Search.Twitter
  72. Posting quick nursing assessments that feed into electronic medical records (EMRs)
  73. Improving medical rounding systems
  74. Clinical trial awareness
  75. Hospital administration
  76. Sharing peer-to-peer reviews of articles of interest
  77. Connecting patients with similar disease processes
  78. Enhancing health-related support groups (e.g. buddy-systems for depression)
  79. Providing smoking cessation assistance
  80. Medical appliance support (e.g. at-home: colostomy care, infusion-pumps, wound-vacs)
  81. Reporting medical device malfunctions
  82. Tweeting updates to facility policies and procedures
  83. Arranging appointments with health care providers
  84. Product safety alerts
  85. Food safety alerts
  86. Information on women’s health
  87. Pain management
  88. Hospital reputation monitoring
  89. Publishing hospital-sponsored events in local communities
  90. Community health outreach
  91. Bioterrorism awareness and preparedness
  92. Issuing updates to hospital services to the public
  93. Insurance claim management
  94. Ethical, permission-based following of patients
  95. Micro-sharing consent for surgical and other procedures
  96. Patient-sharing of health-related experiences
  97. Posting ‘bread crumbs’ of facility experiences (”I had a bypass at this hospital and it went well but the food almost killed me.”)
  98. Patient searches for others confronting similar problems
  99. Stress management
  100. Mental health awareness
  101. Posting homeless shelter needs
  102. Food bank resource management
  103. Transmitting patient data to patients who are traveling abroad
  104. Generating streams of authoritative health care content online
  105. Exposing medical quakery
  106. Micro-sharing documentation for advanced medical directives
  107. Discussing public health care policy
  108. Developing stronger patient-provider relationships
  109. Tracking the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals
  110. Following health marketing
  111. Tracking influenza alerts from the CDC
  112. Exchanging/soliciting scientific validation of alternative health claims
  113. Following ad-hoc conferences on eHealth like HealthCampPhila
  114. Tracking toxic diseases
  115. Tracking HIV news
  116. Issuing/exchanging dietary tips
  117. Tweeting what you eat
  118. Comparing nursing home performance
  119. Coordinating clinical instruction
  120. Communicating with nursing supervisors
  121. Public safety announcements
  122. Tracking FDA guideline updates
  123. Tracking the progress of developing pharmaceuticals
  124. Broadcasting infant care tips to new parents
  125. Publishing vaccination/immunization services locations, hours and reminders
  126. Reporting adverse events to FDA (currently not available via Twitter: why not?)
  127. Obtaining information on Medicare and Medicaid
  128. Case management functions
  129. Clinical education coordination
  130. Facilitating patient-transfer processes
  131. Patient-information retrieval
  132. Reporting breeches of universal precautions in health care facilities
  133. Posting daily nursing tips
  134. Exchanging physician humor (we’re all human)
  135. Closing the digital divide with respect to health care information
  136. Coordinating allied health care services during patient admissions
  137. Coordinating patient discharges with all services
  138. Post-discharge patient consultations and follow-up care
  139. Helping device technicians to communicate directly with manufacturers
  140. Discussing HIPAA reform in the age of micro-sharing

Blogger’s Guide to Expertise: Lorelle VanFossen’s “Blogging Tips: What Bloggers Won’t Tell You About Blogging”

Reuters.com published this deansguide article September 24, 2008

I never push my readers to read or subscribe to someone’s blog or website. I feel it is their choice, their time, and their preferences that are most important. But I am going to break that rule this one time. If you are about to establish a blog, a beginning blogger, an intermediate blogger, an experienced blogger, or if you think you know everything about blogging–you MUST check out Lorelle VanFossen.

Why Lorelle VanFossen?

Complex strategies made simple, hands on help made easy, effective and valuable guidelines made accessible, and the energy to continuously deliver fresh valuable content without asking for anything in return. Lorelle is an incredible resource.

Lorelle Van Fossen was a presenter at WordPress’s Word Camp 2008 in San Francisco and she made a huge impression on the audience. She is an expert on WordPress, how to stretch that platform to it’s limits, and everything blogging. On top of those facts, Lorelle is very giving of her time and energy to help people–she’s one of the good ones.

Authority and Substance Factor

Lorelle VanFossen is one of the leading experts on WordPress software, techniques, strategies, and writing. Her blog Lorelle.wordpress.com is a massive treasure chest full of help and answers. Lorelle’s blog mantra:

“Helping You Learn More About Blogging and WordPress Every Day With Help, Tips, Advice, and Techniques For Blogging and Using WordPress, and WordPress.com. The Blogging Help You Need. Now”

Must Read For Any Blogger

Although it is a beginner’s guide to blogging, “Blogging Tips” has many very valuable tips and strategies for the intermediate and advanced blogger. Yes all of the type of information Lorelle has outlined exists for free online–if you are willing to research each author’s reputation, compile the information, and then organize it from ground zero to advanced techniques. For a sample chapter and the chance to see what I am raving about go here for your free chapter

Why This Book?

1. It is organized extremely well leaving out nothing for chance

2. The text is simple and easy to digest

3. Bullet points, well thought out examples, and commentary lead the reader at their own pace on a learning expedition

4. Lorelle addresses your motivation. Do you blog for fun, to write, or for business. She approaches each with strategy and useful advice

5. Succinct style as this book is 92 power packed pages

6. SEO tactics

7. Blogger Rights section with copyright information

8. Community Building strategies

9. Blog Management and Administration

10. Work-Book Size and Index section make this an easy book to cross reference

Analysis

People are curious animals in that many of us do not want to take the time to buy a book. If it’s free we can find it online. Yet when push comes to shove, we don’t always find the right information. We don’t spend the time to investigate, and we don’t make the learning process a priority.

Suggestion: The Best $12.95 You Will Ever Invest

Invest in yourself, your blogging, and your education. Buy Lorelle’s book as it is the best $12.95 I have spent in years! At the very least subscribe to Lorelle’s blog and begin to reap the benefits!

Brand “You” By Establishing Your Writing and Public Speaking Platforms

“People who are effective speakers come across as more comfortable with themselves, more confident, and more attractive to be around. Being able to speak effectively means you can sell anything-products, of course, but also ideas, ideologies, and worldviews.” -Dustin Wax Lifehack

Throughout your business career if you have worked for a corporation or small company you have probably “towed the company line.” That is to say you learn the products, services, and culture inside out and you are able to repeat the benefits and features of your employer to anyone interested in listening-or not.

How Do I Brand Me?

“The good news — and it is largely good news — is that everyone has a chance to stand out. Everyone has a chance to learn, improve, and build up their skills. Everyone has a chance to be a brand worthy of remark.”-Tom Peters “The Brand Called You” Fastcompany.com

1. Differentiating Factors: what is your Differentiating Factor? Do you have great experience in your niche, well known company experience, negotiating success, or any other accomplishments that help you stand out from the crowd?

What Do I Do To Brand Me?

“Politicians brand you. So do marketers-and your boss and co-workers. If you don’t take control of your brand, you’ll forever be stuck with how the world judges you.” -Diane Brady BusinessWeek

1. Writing: create a writing platform within your business. Whether you are an employee of a large firm or an agent in a brokerage begin writing.

a.) How To: write step by step guides on how to do things

b.) Lists: write top 10 lists or 5 things that will help people. . .

c.) Profiles: write about other industry professionals, your clients, or your niche

d.) Analysis: analyze your industry, a new product or service, or anything in the news about your industry

2. Vehicle to Deliver: establish a blog. This is the best method to deliver your message. If you will not write a blog then produce a weekly newsletter for email distribution as well as hard copy distribution. Trade magazines or ezines, prominent bloggers in your niche who will allow you to become a contributor

3. Public Speaking: create a public speaking-workshop platform within your business.

a.) How To: utilize your writing platform for scripts or workshop content for your speaking platform

b.) Research: your niche for effective speakers; evaluate their topics, create a list of workshops of value

4. Approach Organizations: offer your keynote or workshop for free. Speak at Rotary, Lions Clubs, industry meetings, your company, affiliates, career fairs, employment groups, schools, womens organizations, networking groups, or on a soap box in the parking lot of your local 7-11. JUST SPEAK! Get out and do it. Your practice will lead to confort and exposure

Results

1. Writing provides a constant flow of information about you, about your expertise, and it becomes your moving “living” resume. It demonstrates your ability to communicate on a level most people will appreciate. Your helpful writing give people the perception you are there to help

2. Speaking provides quick exposure and viral marketing word of mouth opportunities. Do a good job and your audience becomes your instant “commercial” to their friends and family.

Microsoft’s Subscription Model: Signal That Software License Gouging May Be Over Or Death Knell To A Business Model?

Ziff Davis Enterprise “Microsoft Watch” writer Joe Wilcox published this deansguide article July 4, 2008

Reuters.com published this deansguide article July 4, 2008

In the face of the free-ware generation, copyright infringing masses, Microsoft corporation, the monolith of the 1980′s, and leader of the software licensing business model announced today that they are launching a subscription based model. This news begs the question:

Has the software industry, primarily Microsoft, seen the last days of price gouging through software licensing? Is this the death of the Microsoft business model?

Analysis

As a former national account manager for a software reseller, I managed the software utilization for one of America’s largest banks-Wells Fargo. In my experience within this niche, two things came to my mind immediately in 2001:

1. Rip Off: Companies were buying licenses and being ripped off by licensing requirements, lack of understanding of the price matrix, and the forced obsolecence of perfectly fine operating systems.

Note: Microsoft’s cash cow was based on planned obsolecence and they milked that bad boy to the hilt–killing the golden goose in the process

2. Sharing: rogue companies were already burning software, hacking packages, and attempting to proliferate their resources without having to pay exorbenant fees for the licensing of what they felt was their own property

Final Final

It is a new age with the onset of Web 2.0 readying the approach of Web 3.0. Transparency in business practices, shared intellectual properties, value based giving, and citizen journalism through the phenomenon called blogging has changed our business world forever–and for the better.

SEO “Keyword Research” Module #2: Realtor’s Guide to Understanding Your Target Audience Language

Published on Active Rain for the Real Estate Community

Keywords, keyword phrases, and keyword research are the next step to understanding how to attract traffic to your blog. In our first Module “SEO Basics” we provided links to SEO information to begin your education into this very important step in your marketing campaign. Searchenginepeople.com writer Ruud Hein provides an excellent look at how important keywords and keyword phrases are to your business.

Audience Language

Your aim should be to identify the keywords and keyword phrases that your target audience will utilize in searching for information about your product(s), service(s), business, industry and the area you operate within

Keywords and Keyword Research

List of Keyword Tools To Help You Find Your Audience “Language”

1. Google Adwords Keyword Tool: Get fresh ideas from the leader in the industry

2. Free Keywords: Another place to find new keywords is at freekeywords.wordtracker.com site

3. Keyword Discovery: “Over 80% of online transactions begin with a keyword search” and according to NAR over 70% of consumers interested in buying or selling real estate begin their search online. This site is a fantastic spot to begin your search with the Keyword Discovery tool.