6 Key Transition Questions To Ask Yourself In Between Jobs

Reuters.com published this deansguide article August 9, 2008

The following is content from author Susan Hanshaw and her new book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live” a self help book that enables “you to become your own life coach.” Debra Costner’s Bay Area Business Woman newspaper, Backdoorjobs.com, and the Modernwomansdivorceguide.com have all contributed excellent reviews for Susan Hanshaw’s work:

Being in between jobs doesn’t have to be experienced like the kiss of death. I know that it is natural to feel very vulnerable, yet that is what being in transition is all about. It’s the very point that you are temporarily unattached to a job that provides you with a rare freedom to ask yourself what you really want from your next adventure.

Key Questions to Ask Yourself In Between Jobs

1. How Soon Do I Really Have to Land a Job?

2. Can I afford some time to step back and evaluate what I really want from my career?

Now is the time I may have the freedom and time to prepare for it

Note: Sure, it’s no fun watching your life savings take a downward climb, but is your time here really about the money?

3. Am I at a point in my life where I can afford to spend some time being selective about my next step or preparing for a new path?

Think of your career choices now as investments in your quality of life.

4. Would the jobs I am now searching for be my top choices if I were just starting out?

You spend a majority of your waking hours at your job. Consider it like you would a romantic relationship. Are you willing to settle for second best just to be committed?

5. Is it possible to support myself financially doing what I love?

Make a list of all the different ways you can generate income by doing what you love. Your financial support does not have to come from one income stream. Maybe one single role can’t generate enough money, but adding other roles that express your passions might make the necessary difference.

6. Are credentials getting in my way of going for jobs I really want?

Ask yourself if you are truly lacking what is necessary, or if credentials are a convenient excuse to protect you from risk or rejection. Research the kinds of credentials that others doing similar work have. If you don’t have what it takes, identify sources that can provide the appropriate credentials. Don’t make assumptions without checking the facts about the true requirements to do the work.

www.innerarchitect.com