Are We As A Nation Afraid To Blog: American’s Writing Skills At Issue?

Why are American businesses and business people afraid to blog? What is the biggest “perceived” obstacle to entry? Training is a burgeoning area that corporations are addressing by spending record amounts of time, capital, and monies.

The missing factor is a recognized effort on the part of American businesses and business people to improve their writing and grammar skills.

According to a 1994 National Institiute for Literacy study “The Educational Quality of the Workforce National Employer Survey” stated:

“only 25.1%” of training was focused on “literacy/numeracy” training aka English and Math skills

The Big Picture

In 2004 the National Commission on Writing produced a fantastic report “Writing: A Ticket to Work or a Ticket Out, A Survey of Business Leaders” surveying 120 human resource directors who are participants of Business Roundtable. The following are some interesting findings:

1. People who cannot write and communicate clearly will not be hired, and if already working, are unlikely to last long enough to be considered for promotion

Analysis: Writing skills are both a marker of high wage, high skill professional work

2. Two-thirds of salaried employees in large American companies have some writing responsibility

Analysis: Realtors and entrepreneurs often fail to recognize the role that writing plays in their success or failures

3. 80% or more of services, finance, insurance, and real estate companies evaluate writing skills during the hiring process

4. 40% of firms surveyed offer or require writing skills training for employees with deficiencies

5. The Commission estimates that “remedying deficiencies in writing costs American corporations as much as $3.1 billion annually

The perceived challenges to entry into blogging may be more than just perception. The problems with literacy and writing skills may actually be the core root of why this incredible marketing tool remains grossly under utilized, systematically ignored, and ultimately unappreciated by those who would benefit the most.